Filtering by Tag: existentialism

The Ruins Of The Tower Of Babel

First of all, I want you to know that yesterday I released my short film Introducing Lilith. It’s now on YouTube and, of course, on this website (on the ‘pictures’ section). It’s a film I really care about because of many reasons: if you’ve got 2 minutes (literally), I suggest you check it out. Also, the soundtrack of the film is available on iTunes/Apple Music, Spotify, Amazon etc. Among all the pieces of music I composed, it’s probably my favourite one, so I would be particularly happy if you listened to it and left a feedback to give me your opinion.

Now, I’ll probably talk about these new releases next week. Today, I’d like to write about the last song of the album I’m recording, Songs Of Fear And Agony. I discussed the themes of all the others, so this will be the last post of the series.

The song is called The Ruins Of The Tower Of Babel:

 

When I’m alone, I’ll fall into

Antique Italian dreams, among

Thoughts made of marble, tears of paint

And ghosts mouthing rhymes.

 

In churches built of human blood,

I’ll listen to God’s harmony.

And when I return, I’ll tell

Everyone of my secret life.


Who would really comprehend my words?

Who would try to understand

Who I really am?


For now, I’d better hold my tongue

And work on some new cryptic lines,

While German songs and Indian chants

Try hard to overcome the noise.


We all belong to it now, and to

The unbridled Irish wind:

A frenzied oracle of hope that

Speaks in tongues and we can’t see.


Who would really comprehend his words?

Who would try to understand

Who he really is?


Who would really comprehend our words?

Who would try to understand

Who we really are?


A floating world would be enough

For me to face a sudden change,

Although my poor, chaotic talk

Would force me to lie ceaselessly.


Concealed behind the shadows

Of countless Japanese identities,

I’d greet the darkness, kneel

And, lastly, enjoy my solitude.

 

I think it’s fairly easy to understand that one of the main themes of the lyrics is ‘communication’ (or, better, the absence of it). The myth of the Tower of Babel has always been used extensively to discuss this particular topic, so this won’t come as a surprise. If we looked at the lyrics more carefully, though, we would find a deeper meaning concealed underneath the first one: loneliness.

It would be hard for me to deny that this song is particularly personal. To a certain extent, it’s even autobiographical, and the references to Italy and Ireland are there to prove it. At the same time, and this might probably sound strange to some people, Dublin has always made me feel less lonely, so the adjective ‘autobiographical’ wouldn’t be accurate.

Loneliness has been used many times to describe two different feelings. A person who’s got not friends or partners experiences loneliness, for example, and so does someone who can’t feel the presence of, let’s say, God. The two situations, although intrinsically connected, are different: interpersonal loneliness and existential loneliness are not the same.

When I was writing The Ruins Of The Tower Of Babel, I knew exactly what I wanted to do: I wanted to write about interpersonal loneliness in order to talk about its counterpart. I pictured myself lost in a city full of people I could’t understand, a city built upon the ruins of the Tower of Babel, and I pictured many, many people like me.

There they are... Why can’t they understand each other? It’s because they (their fathers) built the Tower of Babel: it’s because they wanted to reach God.

Now, does interpersonal loneliness, absence of communication, or even absence of empathy, come directly from the absence of God, or his inaccessibility? Does it come from existential loneliness?

 

Thanks for reading! 

 

Building Of The Tower Of Babel, Hendrick van Cleve III, About 1525 - 1589

Building Of The Tower Of Babel, Hendrick van Cleve III, About 1525 - 1589

Sisyphus

‘The gods had condemned Sisyphus to ceaselessly rolling a rock to the top of a mountain, whence the stone would fall back of its own weight. They had thought with some reason that there is no more dreadful punishment than futile and hopeless labour.’

The Myth Of Sisyphus, Albert Camus

In my previous posts, I wrote about the themes of two of the songs I’m recording: ‘Pandora’ and ‘Prometheus’. What I didn’t say is that they’re part of a trilogy of songs inspired by Greek mythology, the third one being ‘Sisyphus’.

As I already explained, ‘Pandora’ is about depression, and in the lyrics, I focused my attention on the ‘misdeed’ (the cause).

‘Prometheus’, on the other hand, is about pain (the effect).

Now, ‘Sisyphus’ is a bit different because it’s not directly connected to the other two. It is about OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), and it’s much more ironic (but not lighthearted).

It begins like this:

I always tried to fail.

I always failed to try.

I tried to find some symmetry.

I failed to mention why.

My mind's a perfect sphere,

A tidy globe of theories,

Smooth and abstract,

Real and compact,

Overpacked with queries.

Instead of writing about the ‘misdeed’ or the ‘punishment’, the cause and the effect, I decided to write about ‘the absurd’, a concept that in my opinion can be easily connected to OCD. 

Thanks for reading! 

Sisyphus, Titian, 1548 - 1549

Sisyphus, Titian, 1548 - 1549

© Black Art 2019