Filtering by Tag: film

A New Beginning

Dear everyone,

It’s been a while since I wrote my last post, and although I feel slightly guilty, I really needed to take a break from the internet and focus on my personal life.

It’s been a while, but not much has changed: I’m currently mixing my album Fear & Agony and I’m desperately trying to produce my film Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts. I’m also working on a new album and a new film, but it’s too early to talk about that.

For those who are wondering what happened to Fear & Agony, let me just say that I was delayed because of the crowdfunding campaign of my film and other personal issues. I really wanted to release it this summer but, unfortunately, that didn’t happen. Hopefully, I’ll be able to release it pretty soon.

As for Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts, I don’t want to say too much, but… I probably found a way to make it, which means that, at last, I will be able to use the funds I gathered thanks to the fantastic people who helped me.

And that leads me to something else:

Dear Indiegogo supporters, I haven’t forgotten about you. I rejoice when I think of your kindness and your generosity, and it’s time for you to see my Agalmatophilia-related short film Introducing Adam. If you’ve received this post by email, have a look at the bottom of the page.

For those who don’t know, Introducing Adam is a short film I made during the crowdfunding campaign of Agalmatophilia: ATITA. It’s related to the feature, but I think it could be enjoyed as a standalone work anyway. 

I consider it my best short film so far, although it’s one of the least accessible, I’m afraid. Hugh Cannon, the actor who plays Adam, is simply extraordinary, and he’s the main reason the film actually works.

Introducing Adam will also be released on Vimeo and YouTube in the near future so, even if you weren’t one of the crowdfunding campaign backers, you’ll have the opportunity to watch it soon.

One more thing. I know that in my last post I said that I would create two different sections on gavinomarianomura.com - News and Art Journal - but, as it often happens, I changed my mind. I don’t want to have an impersonal News section: I want to tell you what’s happening using my own words. That’s the beauty of the Internet, isn’t it?

Take care,

Gavino

P.s. Please listen to the new Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds album Ghosteen:

https://open.spotify.com/album/6UOvMBrdfOWGqSvtQohiso?si=no02O9_6RIeKbozWBonpLw

I’d love to know what you think of it.

The Sun, Edvard Munch, 1909

The Sun, Edvard Munch, 1909



Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts Crowdfunding Campaign (A New Short Film)

Dear everyone,

The crowdfunding campaign of my film Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts (link below) has almost come to an end. In around a week, I’ll have to say goodbye to Indiegogo, and I’ll find myself, once again, in the real world (of course, that’s a lie). 

I wrote that I would spend the last half of the crowdfunding campaign posting content about the film itself, but unfortunately (fortunately), I had an idea for a new short film and... Well, I simply had to shoot it as soon as possible! 

Some info about this project: it’s related to Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts, it’s called Introducing Adam: Beyond Creation And Destruction, it will be screened at the closing party of the crowdfunding campaign and my subscribers will be able to see it before everyone else.

As for the posts I haven’t published about the feature film, don’t worry (you were worried, weren’t you?): you will see them after the crowdfunding campaign is over on the gavinomarianomura.com Art Journal (now that I think about it, this piece of info is useful only if you’re reading this on Indiegogo). 

And speaking of my Art Journal, I’d like you to know that its format will change a bit. I want to keep posting my thoughts on art and aesthetics, but I would also like to share the news regarding my work on another page. I hope that will make my art posts more engaging.

One more thing: if you have visited the Indiegogo page of my crowdfunding campaign, you have probably noticed that it’s been stuck for a while (sad but true). If you don’t feel any negative feelings coming from this post, well, that’s because I have actually been receiving a series of important external contributions.

At this point, I can’t say for sure that we will be able to shoot the entire feature right away. At the same time, I’m pretty convinced that we will make part of it or, better, that we’ll find other funding sources.

I’ll keep you updated, anyway.

‘But, hey, Gav, you still have a week!’

Yeah, that’s true:

If you haven’t contributed to the campaign yet, please consider doing it now (yeah, I mean, right now). We haven’t got much time left, and every single contribution, even the smallest one, can help us a lot!

Also, if you’re in Dublin on the 21st, come to the Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts Crowdfunding Campaign closing event (link below) organised by my friends at C-47 (whom I thank again for last Thursday’s super funny pub quiz!). The fabulous Nervvs and Jake Regan will be there to play, and there will also be something that art enthusiasts will love (tba).

Yeah, so... That’s it for now!

Take Care,

Gavino

 

Links

Crowdfunding Campaign:  

 https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/agalmatophilia-a-tragedy-in-three-acts/x/16999351#/

Closing Party:

 https://www.facebook.com/events/575605209582976/?ti=ia

C-47: 

 https://www.facebook.com/CollectiveFourtySeven/

Nervvs: 

 https://www.facebook.com/nervvs/

Jake Regan:

https://www.facebook.com/jakereganmusic/ 

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Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts Crowdfunding Campaign Week #01

Dear everyone,

The first week of the crowdfunding campaign of Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts is over.

It was a very intense week, if you ask me, and I feel pretty tired, more than I should be, probably. It’s common for people who do something for the first time to waste too much energy, I guess.

Anyway, it was also a very rewarding week: we reached the 16% of our goal, and even if that doesn’t sound like a lot, statistically, 4 in 5 campaigns that have reached that percentage on the first week succeed.

There’s hope!

Of course, the real campaign starts now: there is no time to rest!

I’d like to thank everyone who spent a bit of his/her time/money to contribute to Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts. I’m really, really, really thankful!

(By the way, I’ll start sending the perks next week, so you’ll receive them pretty soon!)

And if you haven’t visited the Indiegogo page of the campaign, just go to...

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/agalmatophilia-a-tragedy-in-three-acts/x/16999351#/

Of course, when you’re there, select a perk and share! Every kind of contribution can make the difference, believe me.

Now it’s time for me to go to the screening of Incantations at The International Bar in Dublin. It was organised by the C-47 team (https://m.facebook.com/CollectiveFourtySeven/), the same fantastic guys that made Creation, the first video of a trilogy inspired by Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts.

If you haven’t seen it:

https://youtu.be/IuM8tYn-VIY

Take care, 

Gavino

A still from ‘Creation’ by John D Breen (C-47) featuring a sculpture by the artist Ana Carey

A still from ‘Creation’ by John D Breen (C-47) featuring a sculpture by the artist Ana Carey

Crowdfunding Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts

Dear everyone,

I hope your week was enjoyable and productive. Mine was.

If you’ve read my previous posts, the fact that I’ve been working on the crowdfunding campaign for Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts won’t surprise you.

We’re almost there: in a week or so, you will be able to grab some nice artistic stuff in exchange for your contribution.

This is my first crowdfunding campaign and, honestly, I’m already thinking obsessively about a series of things I could have done differently. At the same time, I still believe I’m creating something you don’t usually see, and this is what’s keeping the car running.

I really want everyone to get something from it, and that’s why you won’t find any average ‘Thank You’ perks.

Enough! I don’t want to write too much about it, and it’s time to get back to work.

Enjoy your weekend and, if you haven’t, sign up:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/agalmatophilia-a-tragedy-in-three-acts/coming_soon/x/16999351

Take care,

Gavino

 

Statues by Katarzyna Horzela

Statues by Katarzyna Horzela

Producing Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts

Oh, my… It’s been almost two months since I wrote my last post! I should stop saying things such as ‘Next week, I’ll write about this…’ or ‘In the next few days, I’ll tell you about that…’.

My projects and, especially, my mood are too unpredictable.

But let’s not talk about that! Let’s talk about Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts.

First of all, as you might have noticed, I changed the title. I did it because another film called ‘Agalmatophilia’ (a comedy directed by Jared Masters) has just been released, and I thought it would be polite to do so.

Anyway, apart from that, nothing much has changed: I have the script, I have the will to make the film and... I don’t have a producer!

But let me explain the situation:

Last year, I sent a long series of emails to an equally long series of producers interested in arthouse films. Frankly, I thought nobody would reply, and I was wrong. Some of them did, and that alone made me pathetically happy (it also made me realise that a producer is not a ferocious mythological creature we’re bound to fear and/or despise, but a human being like you and me… Although, there are some exceptions, obviously…). Unfortunately, at the same time, no one seemed willing to produce my film.

Too bad…

Now, I consider myself to be a pretty rational person (now that I think about it… am I?). When something like this happens, I always try to find the reason behind it, and that’s why I asked myself: why was my film rejected?

I could write an entirely new post talking about the most exhaustive answer I could find, which is relatively complex, so I’ll just say:

Because of the same reason Jan Svankmajer and Alejandro Jodorowsky, two of the greatest living filmmakers, decided to launch a crowdfunding campaign to produce their own films.

I think you’ve already understood what I’m about to say.

In two weeks from now, I will launch the official crowdfunding campaign for Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts (damn, I’ve just given myself another deadline… I promise I will do everything I can to meet it, though!).

For now, you’re very welcome to go to the Indiegogo pre-launch page:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/agalmatophilia-a-tragedy-in-three-acts/coming_soon/x/16999351

I and my team have prepared some very interesting perks, so I suggest you sign up and share with everyone you know!


Thanks for reading!

 

A statue made by the fabulous Katarzyna Horzela

A statue made by the fabulous Katarzyna Horzela

Agalmatophilia: The Script

Once again, I’m here to talk about Agalmatophilia, the feature film I’m currently working on. This time, I’d like to write, briefly, about the script.

I think I’ve already mentioned that I started working on Agalmatophilia a few years ago. I had just graduated from college, and I thought it was time for me to work on my first feature.

At first, I wanted to write something more or less accessible to everyone, a script that I could sell, metaphorically and literally. It seemed the best thing to do because, simply, I wanted someone to produce it.

(Having a producer means that you’re free to think, exclusively, about the artistic side of the project)

I started writing a (kind of) realistic story with surreal elements: the realistic (and slightly social) side of it would be appealing to the producers I would send it to, while the surreal one would satisfy my artistic hunger. 

After several months, I had a script, and it was a terrible one. The visionary portion of the story wasn’t enough for me, and the rest of the screenplay was, simply put, shit.

It was so frustrating: I had worked so much on it! I really didn’t know what to do... I asked myself: ‘Should I write something else? Should I concentrate on a completely different project?’. 

Eventually, I decided to write the entire script again, and I’m glad I did that. The script itself couldn’t be fixed but, at the same time, there were many good ideas I had hidden under the aforementioned... shit... Probably, I felt compelled to save them from their ignoble destiny.

Surprisingly (or not), it didn’t take me too long to write what was basically a new script. I was so frustrated by the previous one that I decided to think exclusively about the artistic side of the new one, which was, after all, the only thing I really cared about.

Now, I’ve never been very good at creating sellable works of art, although I would love the situation to be different. Commercial doesn’t necessarily mean bad (although I have to say that it’s particularly easy to find terrible art that sells well...), and some of my favourite artists were/are very good at creating successful books/albums/films (think of Fellini’s La Dolce Vita and David Lynch’s Twin Peaks!). But... What can I do? As an artist, I feel my main goal is to absorb the reality that surrounds me and show the others what can’t, normally, be seen. I’ve trained my eyes, my ears, my nose, my tongue, my skin and, in general, my mind for years in order to do that, and I keep doing it. I can’t write down a story only because it’s beautiful: my inspiration would do anything to destroy it because it’s not true (one day I’ll write about this: works of art that are as beautiful as they are untrue). That’s what happened with the first draft of the script!

When I finished Agalmatophilia, I started to think about the actual production of the film. I realised that I had just written something that, probably, nobody would be willing to produce.

Next week, I’ll write about this.

 

Thanks for reading!

(Oh, one more thing: if you haven’t, please subscribe to my newsletter. You’ll find the form at the bottom of the page!)

 

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Introducing Lilith’s World: Agalmatophilia

First of all, a giant ‘Thank you!’ to all the people that subscribed to my new newsletter.

I’m sincere when I say that it means a lot.

Thanks, thanks and thanks again! 

Now...

Let me update you on what’s happening right now in my artistic life.

If you’ve read my previous posts, you already know that I’m currently working on my first music album, Fear & Agony (yeah, that’s the title now). I’m happy to announce that the recording sessions are almost over: in a week or so I will have all the tracks I need to start mixing the album (that is, to give the mess I’ve created to a sound engineer). Hopefully, it will be released in January.

The second big project is Agalmatophilia, a feature film I’ve been working on for a long time and that I’d like to introduce to you with a series of related posts, this being the first one.

(If you haven’t, I suggest you visit the page I created for it on this website and subscribe for news and updates!)

So...

Let’s start with some questions:

1. What does Agalmatophilia mean?

According to everyone’s favourite encyclopaedia:

Agalmatophilia (from the Greek agalma 'statue', and -philia φιλία = love) is a paraphilia involving sexual attraction to a statue, doll, mannequin or other similar figurative object.

 (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agalmatophilia)

Of course, I’m not going to tell you why I chose that title.  I hate spoilers.

2. What’s the connection between this project and Introducing Lilith, the short film that is featured at the bottom of its official page?

Well, this is pretty simple, and I basically talked about it in one of my previous posts: Introducing Lilith was meant to be the teaser trailer of Agalmatophilia (or, better, Lilith, as the film was called a couple of years ago). Unfortunately, I wasn’t particularly happy with the screenplay at the time, and I simply decided to work and work on it again. It’s something I definitely don’t regret.

3. Are you currently shooting Agalmatophilia?

No, I’m not... 

4. Is Agalmatophilia in pre-production?

I really (really, reallly, really, really, really, really) wish it was...

5. So... What are you doing right now (apart from writing some new stuff and producing the already mentioned Fear & Agony) ?

That’s a good question! What have I been doing since I finished writing the script around a year ago?

Well, I’ve been looking for a producer... Unsuccessfully... 

I’ll talk about this next week. For now, let me just say that, if you’re wondering, yes, I’m going to make this film! 

 

Thanks for reading!

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Random Thoughts On Introducing Lilith #03

After the existential question I wrote last week (you decide if I’m ironic or not), it’s time to talk about my promo/short film Introducing Lilith once again.

I wrote ‘my’, but I should have written ‘our’: a film is seldom made by one single person, although it’s difficult for a writer/director to acknowledge that, sometimes (I’m being very honest). 

When I decided to shoot the video, I was lucky enough to have a pretty large number of people willing to work for nothing, basically. Personally, I hate asking people to work for free, and I really believe that every artist/technician should be paid for what he does, but the crew was composed by some of my former classmates, and I thought we could actually help each other by making something that would eventually become a feature film (I made it clear that everyone involved would eventually get a paid job).

Some of my readers (according to the stats of this blog, it seems they/you really exist, and I’m particularly happy about it!)  may know this already: a crew is basically divided in a series of departments that work on different aspects of the film. The camera department, for example, is in charge of the images, while the people of the too often underrated sound department think about the audio.

Now, the job of a director is, in a way, very simple (if we don’t consider the artistic side of it, at least). He basically needs to give a series of inputs to all the departments in order for them to create a portion of the audio/video organism he has in his mind. Of course, a wrong input can undermine the entire work, and I think this fact is one of the main causes of stress in so many film directors: the pressure can be overwhelming.

I have to say that, fortunately, it never happened to me to have major problems during a shoot (maybe because I’ve only directed short films and music videos, who knows?)), and Introducing Lilith was no exception.  At the same time, my work as the director of the film was far from perfect.

The main shot of the film was meant to be a sequence shot.  My idea was: we see Lilith while she is shaping the statue, we follow her as she gets up, reaches the couch, sits down and notices that someone’s in the room with her. Pretty simple! The problem is that, although the camera people were pretty experienced and the art department had done a great job finding the right props, the camera movement I wanted just didn’t work well with the pieces of furniture we had chosen. The camera and the art departments were disconnected, and it was my fault. I was meant to be the connection between them. 

I could have chosen to shoot a series of brief shots instead of the long one I wanted, but I was afraid the crew would understand that I had made a mistake. What a stupid thing to do! I put my ego before the work of art we were making: one of the greatest sins for an artist.

I was lucky because I was able to fix the problem in post-production, and I think the film itself doesn’t look bad at all, but the feeling of having betrayed my inspiration and the crew is still with me.

 

Thanks for reading!

 

On the set of Introducing Lilith...

On the set of Introducing Lilith...

Random Thoughts On Introducing Lilith #02

If you’re asking yourself why I’m writing a series of posts on a pretty simple 2-minute short film, well, that’s easy: it’s part of a much more complex world I’m currently working on. I’m basically getting ready to introduce it.

Let’s talk about the script.  

The screenplay of Introducing Lilith is, simply put, an excerpt from a much bigger piece of writing, Agalmatophilia. It used to be, actually: Agalmatophilia is now something different, and what happens in the short film is not there anymore.

As I already wrote in the last post, Introducing Lilith was supposed to be a sort of promo, an introduction to the feature film I want (I need... I have...) to make. When I changed the main script, I was a bit afraid I wouldn’t be able to use Introducing Lilith anymore, and the problem wasn’t the fact that the scene had changed... The problem was that the character itself had changed!

Lilith, the Lilith of the short film, is someone who, in a certain way, rules the visionary world she is part of. She’s not afraid of it because she knows it. That’s not the case anymore, but it’s too early to talk about that. 

I decided to release Introducing Lilith anyway. Why? Because I thought it would be interesting to show two different versions of the same character. In a way, it’s like exposing one of the most hidden sides (secrets?) of storytelling.

Yeah, well, actually...  I thought it would be interesting to show FIVE different versions of the character: we’re going to see (at least) four different people called Lilith in the feature film, so...

I’m a storyteller, and I tell the others what I see/hear/feel in general. If I see three, four, five, six different characters who are supposed to be the same person, I’m not going to choose only one. How could I? It wouldn’t be the truth. And why should I? My film wouldn’t be produced by a film production company anyway.

(A message from the deepest part of my heart: fuck the screenwriting rules)

 

Thanks for reading! 

 

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Random Thoughts On Introducing Lilith #01

Introducing Lilith...

Ah, there’s so much I could say about that, so I’ll start with a very simple introduction:

If you haven’t read my last post, it’s important for you to know that I’m talking about a short film I directed a couple of years ago (you can find it on this website and on YouTube: if you have time, check it out and tell me what you think of it!). Although it’s the most incomplete of all my works, it’s also among the most important ones.

Essentially, Introducing Lilith is the weird teaser trailer of a feature film I really (really, really, really) want to produce as soon as possible. Two years ago I thought it would be a good idea to shoot an introduction to the main character of my screenplay: I wanted to show a series of producers a very brief portion of the world I had in my mind in order to, well, make them produce my film. Unfortunately, the short film didn’t really help me (we’ll talk about that in the future), but I’m happy I realised it anyway.

Why? 

Well... When you spend so much time on a screenplay, you’ve got an entire detailed film in your head, an entire world to explore, and it’s fantastic. The problem is that you don’t know what that world will actually look like when represented in our material dimension, and I can tell you that you would really like to.

Now, Introducing Lilith is for me the first materialisation of the world of Agalmatophilia, which is the feature film I mentioned a few lines above. It’s a sort of faulty materialisation, maybe (there are so many interesting things in Lilith’s studio that can’t be seen, that are not there...), but it exists nonetheless.

In the next few weeks, I will talk about the making of the film, the lessons I learned from the experience and how they’re affecting Agalmatophilia.

 

Thanks for reading! 

 

 

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Incantations

Today I’d like to write about a short film I made in 2016 while studying at Pulse College. It’s called ‘Incantations’ (Ireland, 2016). I never really wrote an introduction to it, so I thought I could do it now.

Although I’ve always seen it as a film, ‘Incantations’ might be considered the music video for a song I recorded in 2014.

If I remember well, I composed some of it when I was 16. Back then, I used to play in a (sort of) band (we weren’t that good, but we had lots of ideas). The band didn’t last long, but the song remained, and, ten years later, I decided to finish it. It later became the title track of my second EP.

The song, as it is now, is about the guitarist of my teenage band. He was my best friend and a very talented musician (you can hear his guitar at the very beginning of the song). Unfortunately, he died of cancer when he was 18.

The title ‘Incantations’ is a reference to some of the songs he wrote and ‘Left behind’, and the film revolves around the concepts of death, grief, loneliness and resurrection.

I’ll talk about them again in the future. 

Thanks for reading!

Incantations, Ireland, 2016

Incantations, Ireland, 2016

© Black Art 2019