Filtering by Tag: films

Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts Crowdfunding Campaign (A New Short Film)

Dear everyone,

The crowdfunding campaign of my film Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts (link below) has almost come to an end. In around a week, I’ll have to say goodbye to Indiegogo, and I’ll find myself, once again, in the real world (of course, that’s a lie). 

I wrote that I would spend the last half of the crowdfunding campaign posting content about the film itself, but unfortunately (fortunately), I had an idea for a new short film and... Well, I simply had to shoot it as soon as possible! 

Some info about this project: it’s related to Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts, it’s called Introducing Adam: Beyond Creation And Destruction, it will be screened at the closing party of the crowdfunding campaign and my subscribers will be able to see it before everyone else.

As for the posts I haven’t published about the feature film, don’t worry (you were worried, weren’t you?): you will see them after the crowdfunding campaign is over on the gavinomarianomura.com Art Journal (now that I think about it, this piece of info is useful only if you’re reading this on Indiegogo). 

And speaking of my Art Journal, I’d like you to know that its format will change a bit. I want to keep posting my thoughts on art and aesthetics, but I would also like to share the news regarding my work on another page. I hope that will make my art posts more engaging.

One more thing: if you have visited the Indiegogo page of my crowdfunding campaign, you have probably noticed that it’s been stuck for a while (sad but true). If you don’t feel any negative feelings coming from this post, well, that’s because I have actually been receiving a series of important external contributions.

At this point, I can’t say for sure that we will be able to shoot the entire feature right away. At the same time, I’m pretty convinced that we will make part of it or, better, that we’ll find other funding sources.

I’ll keep you updated, anyway.

‘But, hey, Gav, you still have a week!’

Yeah, that’s true:

If you haven’t contributed to the campaign yet, please consider doing it now (yeah, I mean, right now). We haven’t got much time left, and every single contribution, even the smallest one, can help us a lot!

Also, if you’re in Dublin on the 21st, come to the Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts Crowdfunding Campaign closing event (link below) organised by my friends at C-47 (whom I thank again for last Thursday’s super funny pub quiz!). The fabulous Nervvs and Jake Regan will be there to play, and there will also be something that art enthusiasts will love (tba).

Yeah, so... That’s it for now!

Take Care,

Gavino

 

Links

Crowdfunding Campaign:  

 https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/agalmatophilia-a-tragedy-in-three-acts/x/16999351#/

Closing Party:

 https://www.facebook.com/events/575605209582976/?ti=ia

C-47: 

 https://www.facebook.com/CollectiveFourtySeven/

Nervvs: 

 https://www.facebook.com/nervvs/

Jake Regan:

https://www.facebook.com/jakereganmusic/ 

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Introducing Lilith’s World: Agalmatophilia

First of all, a giant ‘Thank you!’ to all the people that subscribed to my new newsletter.

I’m sincere when I say that it means a lot.

Thanks, thanks and thanks again! 

Now...

Let me update you on what’s happening right now in my artistic life.

If you’ve read my previous posts, you already know that I’m currently working on my first music album, Fear & Agony (yeah, that’s the title now). I’m happy to announce that the recording sessions are almost over: in a week or so I will have all the tracks I need to start mixing the album (that is, to give the mess I’ve created to a sound engineer). Hopefully, it will be released in January.

The second big project is Agalmatophilia, a feature film I’ve been working on for a long time and that I’d like to introduce to you with a series of related posts, this being the first one.

(If you haven’t, I suggest you visit the page I created for it on this website and subscribe for news and updates!)

So...

Let’s start with some questions:

1. What does Agalmatophilia mean?

According to everyone’s favourite encyclopaedia:

Agalmatophilia (from the Greek agalma 'statue', and -philia φιλία = love) is a paraphilia involving sexual attraction to a statue, doll, mannequin or other similar figurative object.

 (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agalmatophilia)

Of course, I’m not going to tell you why I chose that title.  I hate spoilers.

2. What’s the connection between this project and Introducing Lilith, the short film that is featured at the bottom of its official page?

Well, this is pretty simple, and I basically talked about it in one of my previous posts: Introducing Lilith was meant to be the teaser trailer of Agalmatophilia (or, better, Lilith, as the film was called a couple of years ago). Unfortunately, I wasn’t particularly happy with the screenplay at the time, and I simply decided to work and work on it again. It’s something I definitely don’t regret.

3. Are you currently shooting Agalmatophilia?

No, I’m not... 

4. Is Agalmatophilia in pre-production?

I really (really, reallly, really, really, really, really) wish it was...

5. So... What are you doing right now (apart from writing some new stuff and producing the already mentioned Fear & Agony) ?

That’s a good question! What have I been doing since I finished writing the script around a year ago?

Well, I’ve been looking for a producer... Unsuccessfully... 

I’ll talk about this next week. For now, let me just say that, if you’re wondering, yes, I’m going to make this film! 

 

Thanks for reading!

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Art Evolution

Three days ago, I wrote a very brief post about the implications of being an independent artist. It wasn’t particularly informative, to be honest, but I’m happy I did it because on the same day I received a very interesting comment on Instagram:

@neva_2018 About your post: I often wonder if creative works are ‘selected’ over time for traits that make them more competitive in the book market, like ‘literary evolution’. Do these popular works deserve their selection? Based on what general traits are they selected? What are your thoughts?

(By the way, I suggest you check @neva_2018’s Instagram profile: you’ll find some very interesting poems!)

The following day I wrote a very long reply and... I deleted it by mistake... Undaunted, I decided to write an entire post about the topic.

So here it is (if you’re not into literary theory, I suggest you skip this post. Come to visit this page on Wednesday, though: I’ve got some good news about my music!):

First of all, I’ve got to say that I’m not a scholar and this is not an essay: only my very humble (and probably disconnected) thoughts.

As far we know, humans have always tried to select and preserve the best works of art, but there’s always been a problem: what does ‘best’ mean, when applied to art, and literature in particular? Things get even more complicated if we realise that the concept of art itself has changed through the history of mankind.

In my opinion, there’s one precise human aspect that has always played an important role in the ‘literary evolution’, and that’s taste. Unfortunately (that is, fortunately), even during the same period, people’s tastes vary depending on many, many factors (country, social position, age... The list could go on and on).

I recently read a very interesting introduction to one of the most famous books of all time, ‘One Thousand And One Nights’ (or ‘The Arabian Nights’). Although the stories contained in the original manuscripts (most of them, at least) were originated in the Middle-East, India and even China, they didn’t gain much attention until they reached the European countries. That’s because their language wasn’t refined enough to be part of the Arabic canon. People didn’t like them and, even now, many scholars of Arabic literature question their value.

That’s a good example to explain why, personally, I’ve always found sentences like ‘That’s his finest writing’ or  ‘He’s the best writer in the world’ to be essentially naive (please keep in mind that, like most people, I often said things like that). How can an adjective like that be applied to a particularly subjective field as art?

Famously, Aristotle’s opinions on poetry ended up being so influential that for centuries numberless writers tried to stick to what they considered to be sacred rules. Even now, when teaching screenwriting, people take his ‘Poetics’ as fundamental for storytelling. 

(A very personal note: Unfortunately, Many Hollywood producers understood how to make tons of money with a very basic narrative structure, and Hollywood films have always been very influential. Sometimes I feel like the existence of films such as those by Ingmar Bergman, Federico Fellini or Akira Kurosawa is considered a sort of anomaly...)

Funny enough, the tragedies of William Shakespeare, who usually ignored the Aristotelian rules, are more famous than those of many other writers of the same period who followed them. Why? Because the tastes of the English in the 16th century were probably very different from those of the Greeks in the 4th century BC (and I’m not even talking about individual tastes).

Now, I want to get straight to the questions of the Instagram comment I told you about.

My thoughts about taste being fundamental in the selection (and in the preservation) of any work of art are pretty clear, I think, and I also already said that there are many general traits that are appealing to the people of a certain time and of a certain space. There are so many, that I might write an entire book trying to identify them... Sadly, I won’t be able to make a list today.

As for the selected books of the past, I really don’t know if they deserved to be selected. If I replied to this question, I would have to say that they were or they weren’t better than others, and as I said I don’t know how I could affirm something like that while being sincere.

But let’s talk of the book market. For a very long lapse of time, books (and works of art in general) were chosen because people wanted to preserve them. This kind of selection was essential and, as I said multiple times, was dictated by taste. The advent of printing in the 15th century changed everything, though, and everything changed even more with the birth of our capitalistic society around five hundred years after that. Although things are slightly changing, the books we now find in our favourite bookshops were selected by a number of people working in a publishing house.

Did they select them because they simply liked them more than others?

In my opinion, yes and no.

Although I believe many books get published because beautiful or interesting, I’m pretty sure we wouldn’t be able to read them if considered difficult to sell. I say ‘considered’ because, unfortunately (and the internet is here to prove it), it’s very hard to understand what will be successful or not, especially now. There certainly are particular traits that ‘make them more competitive’, but I do believe they’re difficult to analyse (there are probably entire teams that do it) and, most importantly, they’re unpredictable.

The people in the music and film industry, being these two fields particularly commercial, have tried to solve the problem by dictating or directing the taste of the people. This is something that happens for books as well, but I don’t think the problem’s so serious (maybe I’m being very optimistic, though).

Anyway, it seems this system is going to collapse. The artists can now reach the audience directly, and it seems this kind of self-production/self-distribution/self-promotion will last for a while (who knows?).

The art selection is becoming more democratic, but also more brutal, and apart from the artistic merits of a work, advertising and promotion are the essential elements of this reality.

In the end, it still is a matter of people’s tastes, but tastes in ads, probably, more than in art.

Oh, dear! It seems today I wrote a bit too much... I don’t know how many people will reach the end of this post. If you have, you can consider yourself a hero! I’m not sure whether what I wrote above makes sense or not. I didn’t really plan it, so it will probably sound like a chaotic series of random thoughts.

Anyway...

Thanks for reading (I promise I’ll post more entertaining stuff in the future...)!

Aristotle with a Bust of Homer, Rembrandt, 1653

Aristotle with a Bust of Homer, Rembrandt, 1653

Random Thoughts About Art: #01 Writing Songs And Making Films

For many years, I tried to choose between writing songs and making films. I thought I would never have time to do both. I wasn’t right, but it’s true that it can be hard, sometimes. I find myself writing lyrics, editing scenes of my screenplays, recording music and trying to find funds for my films during the same week.

I tried to stop writing music a couple of times: the first time when I was around 20, and the second time when I was around 26. Of course, it didn’t work. If you feel you need to do something (that is, something legal and morally correct... yes...), you shouldn’t stop yourself. It’s that simple. There are compromises you need to accept, yes, but if you really want to do it (and you know it if you really want to), then, do it.

Personally, I now know that I can’t write films if I don’t write songs. Why? Well, although the answer is right above these lines, I usually fool myself saying that...

Songs, being closely related to lyrical poetry, are naturally more personal than films, which are closely related to dramatic poetry: I need to use my voice in order to create voices for my characters.

Does that make any sense?

Thanks for reading! 

Terry Gilliam and Tom Waits

Terry Gilliam and Tom Waits

© Black Art 2019