Filtering by Tag: obsession

Random Thoughts About Art: #04 The Red Shoes

Dear everyone,

If you’re wondering about the title of this post, well, let me just say that the Powell & Pressburger film (more than the fairy tale written by Hans Christian Andersen) could easily represent my artistic life.

My obsession with art will probably be the death of me, physically or psychologically, figuratively or literally.

I know there's no turning back and, honestly, that’s something that scares me and reassures me at the same time.

Take care,

Gavino

 

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The Red Shoes, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, UK, 1948

Sisyphus

‘The gods had condemned Sisyphus to ceaselessly rolling a rock to the top of a mountain, whence the stone would fall back of its own weight. They had thought with some reason that there is no more dreadful punishment than futile and hopeless labour.’

The Myth Of Sisyphus, Albert Camus

In my previous posts, I wrote about the themes of two of the songs I’m recording: ‘Pandora’ and ‘Prometheus’. What I didn’t say is that they’re part of a trilogy of songs inspired by Greek mythology, the third one being ‘Sisyphus’.

As I already explained, ‘Pandora’ is about depression, and in the lyrics, I focused my attention on the ‘misdeed’ (the cause).

‘Prometheus’, on the other hand, is about pain (the effect).

Now, ‘Sisyphus’ is a bit different because it’s not directly connected to the other two. It is about OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), and it’s much more ironic (but not lighthearted).

It begins like this:

I always tried to fail.

I always failed to try.

I tried to find some symmetry.

I failed to mention why.

My mind's a perfect sphere,

A tidy globe of theories,

Smooth and abstract,

Real and compact,

Overpacked with queries.

Instead of writing about the ‘misdeed’ or the ‘punishment’, the cause and the effect, I decided to write about ‘the absurd’, a concept that in my opinion can be easily connected to OCD. 

Thanks for reading! 

Sisyphus, Titian, 1548 - 1549

Sisyphus, Titian, 1548 - 1549

© Black Art 2019