Filtering by Tag: sculpture

Producing Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts

Oh, my… It’s been almost two months since I wrote my last post! I should stop saying things such as ‘Next week, I’ll write about this…’ or ‘In the next few days, I’ll tell you about that…’.

My projects and, especially, my mood are too unpredictable.

But let’s not talk about that! Let’s talk about Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts.

First of all, as you might have noticed, I changed the title. I did it because another film called ‘Agalmatophilia’ (a comedy directed by Jared Masters) has just been released, and I thought it would be polite to do so.

Anyway, apart from that, nothing much has changed: I have the script, I have the will to make the film and... I don’t have a producer!

But let me explain the situation:

Last year, I sent a long series of emails to an equally long series of producers interested in arthouse films. Frankly, I thought nobody would reply, and I was wrong. Some of them did, and that alone made me pathetically happy (it also made me realise that a producer is not a ferocious mythological creature we’re bound to fear and/or despise, but a human being like you and me… Although, there are some exceptions, obviously…). Unfortunately, at the same time, no one seemed willing to produce my film.

Too bad…

Now, I consider myself to be a pretty rational person (now that I think about it… am I?). When something like this happens, I always try to find the reason behind it, and that’s why I asked myself: why was my film rejected?

I could write an entirely new post talking about the most exhaustive answer I could find, which is relatively complex, so I’ll just say:

Because of the same reason Jan Svankmajer and Alejandro Jodorowsky, two of the greatest living filmmakers, decided to launch a crowdfunding campaign to produce their own films.

I think you’ve already understood what I’m about to say.

In two weeks from now, I will launch the official crowdfunding campaign for Agalmatophilia: A Tragedy In Three Acts (damn, I’ve just given myself another deadline… I promise I will do everything I can to meet it, though!).

For now, you’re very welcome to go to the Indiegogo pre-launch page:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/agalmatophilia-a-tragedy-in-three-acts/coming_soon/x/16999351

I and my team have prepared some very interesting perks, so I suggest you sign up and share with everyone you know!


Thanks for reading!

 

A statue made by the fabulous Katarzyna Horzela

A statue made by the fabulous Katarzyna Horzela

Introducing Lilith’s World: Agalmatophilia

First of all, a giant ‘Thank you!’ to all the people that subscribed to my new newsletter.

I’m sincere when I say that it means a lot.

Thanks, thanks and thanks again! 

Now...

Let me update you on what’s happening right now in my artistic life.

If you’ve read my previous posts, you already know that I’m currently working on my first music album, Fear & Agony (yeah, that’s the title now). I’m happy to announce that the recording sessions are almost over: in a week or so I will have all the tracks I need to start mixing the album (that is, to give the mess I’ve created to a sound engineer). Hopefully, it will be released in January.

The second big project is Agalmatophilia, a feature film I’ve been working on for a long time and that I’d like to introduce to you with a series of related posts, this being the first one.

(If you haven’t, I suggest you visit the page I created for it on this website and subscribe for news and updates!)

So...

Let’s start with some questions:

1. What does Agalmatophilia mean?

According to everyone’s favourite encyclopaedia:

Agalmatophilia (from the Greek agalma 'statue', and -philia φιλία = love) is a paraphilia involving sexual attraction to a statue, doll, mannequin or other similar figurative object.

 (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agalmatophilia)

Of course, I’m not going to tell you why I chose that title.  I hate spoilers.

2. What’s the connection between this project and Introducing Lilith, the short film that is featured at the bottom of its official page?

Well, this is pretty simple, and I basically talked about it in one of my previous posts: Introducing Lilith was meant to be the teaser trailer of Agalmatophilia (or, better, Lilith, as the film was called a couple of years ago). Unfortunately, I wasn’t particularly happy with the screenplay at the time, and I simply decided to work and work on it again. It’s something I definitely don’t regret.

3. Are you currently shooting Agalmatophilia?

No, I’m not... 

4. Is Agalmatophilia in pre-production?

I really (really, reallly, really, really, really, really) wish it was...

5. So... What are you doing right now (apart from writing some new stuff and producing the already mentioned Fear & Agony) ?

That’s a good question! What have I been doing since I finished writing the script around a year ago?

Well, I’ve been looking for a producer... Unsuccessfully... 

I’ll talk about this next week. For now, let me just say that, if you’re wondering, yes, I’m going to make this film! 

 

Thanks for reading!

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Pandora

The statue below, which can be found in the Victoria And Albert Museum, London, was made by John Gibson, a Welsh Neoclassical sculptor who worked in Rome during the first half of the 19th century.

It represents Pandora, the first woman created by the gods in Greek mythology, and the ‘box’ (which should be a jar, but that’s another topic) containing all the evils of the world.

Now, the first song I wrote for ‘Songs Of Fear And Agony’ is called ‘Pandora’. It’s not just the first one I wrote, though: it’s also the opening track.

It begins with these lines:

Our words dissolve in fear.

As a stray groan

Betrays the offence:

Someone has unsealed

And hollowed out

The universe.

The ‘someone’ I’m talking about here is meant to be Pandora, while ‘the universe’ is meant to be her box (if you think about it, I’m afraid you’ll discover the foundation of this song to be pretty pessimistic).

When I wrote these first lines, it was clear in my head that that ‘someone’, that ‘Pandora’, was none other than me (me as the person who’s uttering the words), and the box my head.

I soon discovered that this song (for me) was about depression.

Thanks for reading!

Pandora, John Gibson, c. 1860

Pandora, John Gibson, c. 1860

© Black Art 2019