Filtering by Tag: short film

Random Thoughts On Introducing Lilith #03

After the existential question I wrote last week (you decide if I’m ironic or not), it’s time to talk about my promo/short film Introducing Lilith once again.

I wrote ‘my’, but I should have written ‘our’: a film is seldom made by one single person, although it’s difficult for a writer/director to acknowledge that, sometimes (I’m being very honest). 

When I decided to shoot the video, I was lucky enough to have a pretty large number of people willing to work for nothing, basically. Personally, I hate asking people to work for free, and I really believe that every artist/technician should be paid for what he does, but the crew was composed by some of my former classmates, and I thought we could actually help each other by making something that would eventually become a feature film (I made it clear that everyone involved would eventually get a paid job).

Some of my readers (according to the stats of this blog, it seems they/you really exist, and I’m particularly happy about it!)  may know this already: a crew is basically divided in a series of departments that work on different aspects of the film. The camera department, for example, is in charge of the images, while the people of the too often underrated sound department think about the audio.

Now, the job of a director is, in a way, very simple (if we don’t consider the artistic side of it, at least). He basically needs to give a series of inputs to all the departments in order for them to create a portion of the audio/video organism he has in his mind. Of course, a wrong input can undermine the entire work, and I think this fact is one of the main causes of stress in so many film directors: the pressure can be overwhelming.

I have to say that, fortunately, it never happened to me to have major problems during a shoot (maybe because I’ve only directed short films and music videos, who knows?)), and Introducing Lilith was no exception.  At the same time, my work as the director of the film was far from perfect.

The main shot of the film was meant to be a sequence shot.  My idea was: we see Lilith while she is shaping the statue, we follow her as she gets up, reaches the couch, sits down and notices that someone’s in the room with her. Pretty simple! The problem is that, although the camera people were pretty experienced and the art department had done a great job finding the right props, the camera movement I wanted just didn’t work well with the pieces of furniture we had chosen. The camera and the art departments were disconnected, and it was my fault. I was meant to be the connection between them. 

I could have chosen to shoot a series of brief shots instead of the long one I wanted, but I was afraid the crew would understand that I had made a mistake. What a stupid thing to do! I put my ego before the work of art we were making: one of the greatest sins for an artist.

I was lucky because I was able to fix the problem in post-production, and I think the film itself doesn’t look bad at all, but the feeling of having betrayed my inspiration and the crew is still with me.

 

Thanks for reading!

 

On the set of Introducing Lilith...

On the set of Introducing Lilith...

Random Thoughts On Introducing Lilith #02

If you’re asking yourself why I’m writing a series of posts on a pretty simple 2-minute short film, well, that’s easy: it’s part of a much more complex world I’m currently working on. I’m basically getting ready to introduce it.

Let’s talk about the script.  

The screenplay of Introducing Lilith is, simply put, an excerpt from a much bigger piece of writing, Agalmatophilia. It used to be, actually: Agalmatophilia is now something different, and what happens in the short film is not there anymore.

As I already wrote in the last post, Introducing Lilith was supposed to be a sort of promo, an introduction to the feature film I want (I need... I have...) to make. When I changed the main script, I was a bit afraid I wouldn’t be able to use Introducing Lilith anymore, and the problem wasn’t the fact that the scene had changed... The problem was that the character itself had changed!

Lilith, the Lilith of the short film, is someone who, in a certain way, rules the visionary world she is part of. She’s not afraid of it because she knows it. That’s not the case anymore, but it’s too early to talk about that. 

I decided to release Introducing Lilith anyway. Why? Because I thought it would be interesting to show two different versions of the same character. In a way, it’s like exposing one of the most hidden sides (secrets?) of storytelling.

Yeah, well, actually...  I thought it would be interesting to show FIVE different versions of the character: we’re going to see (at least) four different people called Lilith in the feature film, so...

I’m a storyteller, and I tell the others what I see/hear/feel in general. If I see three, four, five, six different characters who are supposed to be the same person, I’m not going to choose only one. How could I? It wouldn’t be the truth. And why should I? My film wouldn’t be produced by a film production company anyway.

(A message from the deepest part of my heart: fuck the screenwriting rules)

 

Thanks for reading! 

 

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Random Thoughts On Introducing Lilith #01

Introducing Lilith...

Ah, there’s so much I could say about that, so I’ll start with a very simple introduction:

If you haven’t read my last post, it’s important for you to know that I’m talking about a short film I directed a couple of years ago (you can find it on this website and on YouTube: if you have time, check it out and tell me what you think of it!). Although it’s the most incomplete of all my works, it’s also among the most important ones.

Essentially, Introducing Lilith is the weird teaser trailer of a feature film I really (really, really, really) want to produce as soon as possible. Two years ago I thought it would be a good idea to shoot an introduction to the main character of my screenplay: I wanted to show a series of producers a very brief portion of the world I had in my mind in order to, well, make them produce my film. Unfortunately, the short film didn’t really help me (we’ll talk about that in the future), but I’m happy I realised it anyway.

Why? 

Well... When you spend so much time on a screenplay, you’ve got an entire detailed film in your head, an entire world to explore, and it’s fantastic. The problem is that you don’t know what that world will actually look like when represented in our material dimension, and I can tell you that you would really like to.

Now, Introducing Lilith is for me the first materialisation of the world of Agalmatophilia, which is the feature film I mentioned a few lines above. It’s a sort of faulty materialisation, maybe (there are so many interesting things in Lilith’s studio that can’t be seen, that are not there...), but it exists nonetheless.

In the next few weeks, I will talk about the making of the film, the lessons I learned from the experience and how they’re affecting Agalmatophilia.

 

Thanks for reading! 

 

 

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Incantations

Today I’d like to write about a short film I made in 2016 while studying at Pulse College. It’s called ‘Incantations’ (Ireland, 2016). I never really wrote an introduction to it, so I thought I could do it now.

Although I’ve always seen it as a film, ‘Incantations’ might be considered the music video for a song I recorded in 2014.

If I remember well, I composed some of it when I was 16. Back then, I used to play in a (sort of) band (we weren’t that good, but we had lots of ideas). The band didn’t last long, but the song remained, and, ten years later, I decided to finish it. It later became the title track of my second EP.

The song, as it is now, is about the guitarist of my teenage band. He was my best friend and a very talented musician (you can hear his guitar at the very beginning of the song). Unfortunately, he died of cancer when he was 18.

The title ‘Incantations’ is a reference to some of the songs he wrote and ‘Left behind’, and the film revolves around the concepts of death, grief, loneliness and resurrection.

I’ll talk about them again in the future. 

Thanks for reading!

Incantations, Ireland, 2016

Incantations, Ireland, 2016

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